Constitutional interpretation

From: (name withheld)
Subject: Constitutional interpretation
Date: August 14, 2018 at 5:56:46 PM MDT

 

You are incapable of interpreting the Constitution. Your leftist ideology inhibits your ability to absorb, comprehend, or accept the principles that our Founders developed for this great country. As you read the Constitution, it is obvious that you selectively disregard words and concepts. You chose whatever supports your narrative. You should read the Federalist papers. If you have, you should read it again, without prejudice, if that’s possible. If that is not possible, then, you are hopeless.

What is most sad, is how vicious your organization is. Your nothing but thugs.

(name withheld)

Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member Mike Farrell
On Aug 14, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Mike  wrote:

 

Dear (name withheld),

Your rant makes many rather general assumptions about the MRFF and judges us by standards that you fail to make clear. That makes your argument useless.

It would be interesting to know what we’ve done to warrant your deciding to label us as “vicious” and “thugs.”

I get your recommendations about what we should read. Consider it done. I’d suggest, if I may, that you read our mission statement.

Mike Farrell

(MRFF Board of Advisors)


Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member John Compere
On Aug 14, 2018, at 7:11 PM, John Compere  wrote:

 

Mr. (name withheld),
 
The US Constitution prohibits the government or its representatives (which includes the military) from promoting or endorsing a religion. The US Supreme Court has continuously & consistently confirmed this as the law of our land. US Armed Forces regulations also prohibit the promotion or endorsement of a religion by the military. The military mission is to defend our nation against its enemies – not promote or endorse a religion. The military sworn service oath is to bear true faith & allegiance to the US Constitution – not to a religion. Those who refuse to respect & obey the Constitution, military regulations & military service oath have the right to seek a civilian career.
 
Military Religious Freedom Foundation is an American non-profit constitutional rights organization (80% Christians) dedicated solely to ensuring the right of military men & women to freedom of religion to which all Americans are entitled under the Constitution. MRFF represents over 57,000 military members (96% Christians) who have requested their right to determine, enjoy & practice their own beliefs be respected & protected without coercive interference from others, especially superiors. MRFF serves them with patriotic pride & will continue to do so.
 
Your malicious message is nothing but an ignominious insult to the 57,000+ good military men & women who have sought MRFF representation. You can be assured they do not believe MRFF is a vicious organization & nothing but thugs. It has been my experience that a man who resorts to nasty name-calling does so because he cannot address a subject with intelligence & integrity.
 
Most Sincerely,
Brigadier General John Compere, US Army (Retired)
Disabled American Veteran (Vietnam)
MRFF Advisory Board Member

On Tue, Aug 14, 2018 at 7:45 PM, wrote:

Establishment Clause


In United States law, the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, together with that Amendment’s Free Exercise Clause, form the constitutional right of freedom of religion. The relevant constitutional text is: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof…”.

The Establishment Clause was based on a number of precursors, including the Constitutions of Clarendon, the Bill of Rights 1689, and the Pennsylvania and New Jersey colonial constitutions. An initial draft by John Dickinson was prepared in conjunction with his drafting the Articles of Confederation. In 1789, then-congressman James Madison prepared another draft which, following discussion and debate in the First Congress, would become part of the text of the First Amendment of the Bill of Rights. The second half of the Establishment Clause includes the Free Exercise Clause, which allows individual citizens freedom from governmental interference in both private and public religious affairs.

The Establishment Clause is a limitation placed upon the United States Congress preventing it from passing legislation respecting an establishment of religion. The second half of the Establishment Clause inherently prohibits the government from preferring any one religion over another. While the Establishment Clause does prohibit Congress from preferring or elevating one religion over another, it does not prohibit the government’s entry into the religious domain to make accommodations for religious observances and practices in order to achieve the purposes of the Free Exercise Clause.

(name withheld)

Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member Mike Farrell
On Aug 14, 2018, at 11:25 PM, Mike  wrote:
Dear (name withheld),

Well said, wasn’t it? So we defend “individual citizens freedom from governmental interference in both private and public religious affairs.” We ensure that people in authority understand that “the Establishment Clause inherently prohibits the government from preferring any one religion over another.” And we agree that facilities and times be made available “to make accommodations for religious observances and practices in order to achieve the purposes of the Free Exercise Clause.”

Such accommodations do not, of course, include allowing a general to promote his personal beliefs in a way that, given the hierarchical nature of the military, discomfits many under his authority who clearly receive the message that this is the boss’s preference and everyone better get it.

If, on the other hand, he wants to give the sermon at an appropriate service of his choosing attended out of choice by people of a similar belief, that’s perfectly within his right and does not violate military regulations.

Thanks for making the case for us.

Mike Farrell

(MRFF Board of Advisors)


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