Nazi headstones

Sir
In my humble opinion before removing these headstones I think some research should be done to see who these men were and their background. As I am sure you know a lot of the career military men and scientists had no choice but to join the Nazi party. Werner von braun for,example the father of the atlas rocket that sent us to the moon. While like you I do not agree with Hitler or his ideology I think it is owed to history to at least see who they were before we erase them
Sincerly
(name withheld)

Response from MRFF Founder and President Mikey Weinstein
Thank you for your thoughtful reply… Irrespective of who these individuals were, the headstone loudly proclaims the validity of Nazism and its leader and founder… That is completely unacceptable and would not even be allowed in their native Germany at all… We are simply talking about removing the headstone and making it like the headstones of other German POWs… There is a real question as to whether they should be buried at all in national veterans cemetery but, for the moment, we are happy with the fact that the Nazi iconography will be removed… Thank you for reaching out… Mikey Weinstein…

Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member Mike Farrell

On Jun 2, 2020, at 2:50 PM, Mike  wrote:

(name withheld),
Thanks for your message.
I think you misunderstand. We have no interest in “erase(ing)” the men in these graves. They are not being moved.
It is only the symbols and dedications to Hitler that we believe had been wrongly allowed to be implicitly honored
in a U.S. Government facility.
The headstones will be replaced by appropriate ones. The graves remain. Our intention was never to dishonor these
men, it was only to strike the symbols of the criminal regime for which they fought.
To your point, Dr. Von Braun was never known to espouse Nazi philosophy or brandish its symbols.
I hope that helps you better understand our position. As you may know, the VA now got the message and is doing just
what we believe needed to be done.
Best,
Mike Farrell
(MRFF Board of Advisors)

Response from MRFF Board Member John Compere

On Jun 2, 2020, at 3:04 PM, John Compere  wrote:

Thank you for your civil communication.
 
The offensive grave headstones with Nazi swastikas & accolades will be easily & economically removed & replaced with more appropriate identifications of the deceased. They can be placed in a Holocaust museum that accurately preserves the history & horror of the Nazi’s gruesome genocide of 6 million children, women & men because they were born of Jesus mothers (like Jesus). Anyone inclined to research these Nazi soldiers who will remain respectfully interred where they rest can certainly do so.
 
Brigadier General John Compere, US Army (Retired)
Disabled American Veteran (Vietnam Era)
Board Member, Military Religious Freedom Foundation

Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member Martin France
On Jun 2, 2020, at 4:48 PM, Martin France  wrote:
(name withheld), thanks for your civil letter.  As a member of the MRFF Advisory Board, I occasionally answer emails like yours for Mikey.   Did you know that there aren’t swastikas on German soldier graves in Germany?  Nor in the German WWII cemeteries in Belgium, Luxembourg, and France–certainly not in Russia or Poland either.  Why?  Because that symbol has been barred in any way except in a museum–it’s just that heinous and revolting to civil society, worldwide.  The VA has now finally decided to send the headstones to the Holocaust Museum–where they belong.  Moreover,
It really doesn’t matter if these soldiers were philosophically part of the Nazi movement or not.  They took up arms as part of that movement, so they’re guilty.
Thanks for your note.
Sincerely,
M France
Brigadier General, USAF (Retired)
MRFF Advisory Board Member

Gentlemen

Thank you all for your kind replies. I was mislead on the version of this article I read.it left me with the impression that the graves were being removed. However in light of what I have learned from your correspondence I think now you are right in removing the swastikas and putting a more appropriate marker. Who knows you might be doing these men a favor
Best regards
(name withheld)

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1 Comment

  1. A.L. Hern

    “Erase [the German soldiers]? As the gravestones currently stand, with their swastikas and words lauding their devotion to Hitler, how much do you know about these men?

    Nothing. And the DVA has never bothered to provide any further information as to who they were, what they personally believed or even why German soldiers should be buried among the very American soldiers they sought to kill, or perhaps even did kill.

    So why should the removal of Nazi iconography and inscriptions now in any way be “erasure”? Their names will remain on their stones, and anyone interested enough to know more about them can do the research to find out, because DVA certainly wasn’t providing it.

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