Ohio MIA table

There is a special place in Hell for you and the people under you!!
If it not bothering anyone then keep your big Jew nose out of it!!
Once again go to hell Jew boy and rot!

(name withheld)


 

Hey (name withheld),

Were you really a Colonel or is that a joke? If you were, I’m sure someone got onto you

and decided we didn’t need antisemitic officers in our military and cashiered you. Or did

you hide your ugly bias and pretend to be an intelligent person?

In any event, it’s good to know the depths to which the military is sometimes capable of sinking.

Mike Farrell

(MRFF Board of Advisors)


 

Dear (name withheld),

You have a sharp tongue.  It’s especially noticeable as contrasted with your dim wits.  Perhaps you’ll find Hell a comfortable home, or at least you’ll enjoy the company of your anti-Semitic bedfellows.  I know with certainty that if such a place exists, Mikey would be the last person on earth to visit you in your eternal stomping grounds.

Cheers,

Blake A. Page
Military Religious Freedom Foundation
Special Assistant to the President
Director of US Army Affairs


First off, I want to say FUCK YOU MIKEY WEINSTEIN. You are a pansy ass that wasted your military career in the JAG Corps while other Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines were out kicking ass and taking names for their country. Who the fuck are you to push for the Bible to be removed from that table? When you pushed for its removal, you dishonored every POW/MIA service member on the rolls, past present and future. Why don’t you put your legal experience to good use and help veterans who are fighting against the VA instead of bullshit crusades. Having served downrange, I can personally testify that there are no atheists when the bullets are flying and mortars and rockets are incoming. You should have been a hand job.

Very insincerely,
(name withheld)

(withheld) “Keyboard Ranger” (withheld),
Rabble rabble rabble rabble to you too!
You clearly don’t understand that the old trope, there are no atheists in foxholes, is a blatant and inscrutable lie.  For reference:
That’s just a short list of atheists who are comfortable enough with exposing themselves to their shit-brained compatriots to publicly announce their beliefs.  Be assured there are more, but when serving with the overwhelming number of rancid twat-waffles such as yourself, many atheists prefer to move along quietly. They do so simply to avoid the pointless nuisance of beratement they’d be subjected to for being outed to their peers.
I hope you don’t ruin your mustard stained wife beater with the spittle you’ve failed to wipe from your chin.
Cheers,
Blake A. Page
Military Religious Freedom Foundation
Special Assistant to the President
Director of US Army Affairs

Dear (name withheld),

First off, I want to say, nice language coming out of a Christian.

 

We are neither an atheist organization nor are we anti-Christian. Mikey is Jewish (and prays to the same Father we do 3 times a day) and 80% of the Board, Advisory Board, volunteers and supporters (244 in total) of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation (MRFF) are Christians. In fact, 96% of our 43,500+ soldier clients are Christians – Catholics, Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Methodist, Lutherans, Baptists, Evangelicals, etc. We fight for the rights of these Christians more than any other religion but it never makes the news.

It is not our view that the Bible has no place on a POW/MIA table but the Constitution and subsequent Supreme Court rulings that we must obey.

As defenders of the Constitution we fight for the separation of church and state.

 

“…but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.” (Article I, III)

This means that from the President to Congress to the military – no one’s job is based on their religion.

 

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion (Establishment Clause), or prohibiting the free exercise thereof (Free Exercise Clause).”(First Amendment)

 

The Establishment Clause means that you cannot favor one religion over another even though it is in the majority. This clause respects the RIGHTS of all religions. Our military is SECULAR and there are people of other faiths that don the uniform that love this country.

 

The Free Exercise Clause (which is subservient to the Establishment Clause) means that our soldiers are free to exercise any religion they want or no religion at all but cannot elevate one God above others.

 

“Because religious belief, or non-belief, is such an important part of every person’s life, freedom of religion affects every individual. Religious institutions that use government power in support of themselves and force their views on persons of other faiths, or of no faith, undermine all our civil rights. Moreover, state support of an established religion tends to make the clergy unresponsive to their own people, and leads to corruption within religion itself. Erecting the “wall of separation between church and state,” therefore, is absolutely essential in a free society.” Thomas Jefferson, to the Virginia Baptists (1808) ME 16:320.

 

This is his second known use of the term “wall of separation,” here quoting his own use in the Danbury Baptist letter.

 

This wording of the original was several times upheld by the Supreme Court as an accurate description of the Establishment Clause.

 

Jefferson’s concept of “separation of church and state” first became a part of Establishment Clause jurisprudence in Reynolds v. U.S., 98 U.S. 145 (1878). In that case, the court examined the history of religious liberty in the US, determining that while the constitution guarantees religious freedom, “The word ‘religion’ is not defined in the Constitution. We must go elsewhere, therefore, to ascertain its meaning and nowhere more appropriately, we think, than to the history of the times in the midst of which the provision was adopted.” The court found that the leaders in advocating and formulating the constitutional guarantee of religious liberty were James Madison and Thomas Jefferson. Quoting the “separation” paragraph from Jefferson’s letter to the Danbury Baptists, the court concluded that, “coming as this does from an acknowledged leader of the advocates of the measure, it may be accepted almost as an authoritative declaration of the scope and effect of the amendment thus secured.

 

In 1878 “separation of church and state” became part of the Establishment Clause BY LAW.

 

The Supreme Court heard the Lemon v. Kurtzman case in 1971 and ruled in favor of the Establishment Clause.

 

Subsequent to this decision, the Supreme Court has applied a three-pronged test to determine whether government action comports with the Establishment Clause, known as the Lemon Test:

Government action violates the Establishment Clause unless it:
1. Has a significant secular (i.e., non-religious) purpose,
2. Does not have the primary effect of advancing or inhibiting religion
3. Does not foster excessive entanglement between government and religion

 

Parker v. Levy:

“This Court has long recognized that the military is, by necessity, a specialized society separate from civilian society… While the members of the military are not excluded from the protection granted by the First Amendment, the different character of the military community and of the military mission requires a different application of those protections. … The fundamental necessity for obedience, and the consequent necessity for imposition of discipline, may render permissible within the military that which would be constitutionally impermissible outside it… Speech [in any form] that is protected in the civil population may nonetheless undermine the effectiveness of response to command.  If it does, it is constitutionally unprotected.” (Emphasis added) Parker v. Levy, 417 U.S. 733, 1974

 

The Bible on the table does not represent all of the 83,000+ POW/MIA’s. Within the missing are soldiers of other beliefs or of no belief system and to deny this is ludicrous, especially since my uncle was an atheist and is MIA.

 

In other words, if you want a Bible on the POW/MIA table you have to include the Tanakh, Koran, representations of other religions and atheism in order to be in compliance with the Constitution, Lemon Test and Parker v. Levy. It’s either all religions or none but because some Christians don’t want to share the table, the Bible had to be removed.

 

The blame is placed squarely at their feet…not ours.

 

“I am for freedom of religion and against all maneuvers to bring about a legal ascendancy of one sect above another.”

Thomas Jefferson’s letter to Elbridge Gerry January 26, 1799

 

Pastor Joan

MRFF Advisory Board Member


 

 

“If it not bothering anyone then keep your big Jew nose out of it!!”

 

If you read the article correctly, you will see that that the table – as it was laid out – did bother some people:

“MRFF founder Mikey Weinstein alleged the inclusion of the Bible was a violation of the U.S. Constitution. He said he intervened at the request of nearly a dozen, mostly Christian, military veterans who utilize the clinic.”

 

“There is a special place in Hell for you and the people under you!!”

 

Really?

 

Seventy-five percent of our Board, Advisory Board, volunteers and supporters are Christian and 96% of our clients (1 can represent many) are Christian, but you have judged and condemned us to hell because we have not fallen in step with your narrow-minded, fundamental interpretation of the Bible.

 

As defenders of the Constitution we fight for the separation of church and state.

 

“…but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.” (Article I, III)

This means that from the President to Congress to the military – no one’s job is based on their religion.

 

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion (Establishment Clause), or prohibiting the free exercise thereof (Free Exercise Clause).”(First Amendment)

 

The Establishment Clause means that you cannot favor one religion over another even though it is in the majority. This clause respects the RIGHTS of all religions. Our military is SECULAR and there are people of other faiths that don the uniform that love this country.

 

The Free Exercise Clause (which is subservient to the Establishment Clause) means that our soldiers are free to exercise any religion they want or no religion at all but cannot elevate one God above others.

 

“Because religious belief, or non-belief, is such an important part of every person’s life, freedom of religion affects every individual. Religious institutions that use government power in support of themselves and force their views on persons of other faiths, or of no faith, undermine all our civil rights. Moreover, state support of an established religion tends to make the clergy unresponsive to their own people, and leads to corruption within religion itself. Erecting the “wall of separation between church and state,” therefore, is absolutely essential in a free society.” Thomas Jefferson, to the Virginia Baptists (1808) ME 16:320.

 

This is his second known use of the term “wall of separation,” here quoting his own use in the Danbury Baptist letter.

 

This wording of the original was several times upheld by the Supreme Court as an accurate description of the Establishment Clause.

 

Jefferson’s concept of “separation of church and state” first became a part of Establishment Clause jurisprudence in Reynolds v. U.S., 98 U.S. 145 (1878). In that case, the court examined the history of religious liberty in the US, determining that while the constitution guarantees religious freedom, “The word ‘religion’ is not defined in the Constitution. We must go elsewhere, therefore, to ascertain its meaning and nowhere more appropriately, we think, than to the history of the times in the midst of which the provision was adopted.” The court found that the leaders in advocating and formulating the constitutional guarantee of religious liberty were James Madison and Thomas Jefferson. Quoting the “separation” paragraph from Jefferson’s letter to the Danbury Baptists, the court concluded that, “coming as this does from an acknowledged leader of the advocates of the measure, it may be accepted almost as an authoritative declaration of the scope and effect of the amendment thus secured.

 

In 1878 “separation of church and state” became part of the Establishment Clause BY LAW.

 

The Supreme Court heard the Lemon v. Kurtzman case in 1971 and ruled in favor of the Establishment Clause.

 

Subsequent to this decision, the Supreme Court has applied a three-pronged test to determine whether government action comports with the Establishment Clause, known as the Lemon Test:

Government action violates the Establishment Clause unless it:
1. Has a significant secular (i.e., non-religious) purpose,
2. Does not have the primary effect of advancing or inhibiting religion
3. Does not foster excessive entanglement between government and religion

 

Parker v. Levy:

“This Court has long recognized that the military is, by necessity, a specialized society separate from civilian society… While the members of the military are not excluded from the protection granted by the First Amendment, the different character of the military community and of the military mission requires a different application of those protections. … The fundamental necessity for obedience, and the consequent necessity for imposition of discipline, may render permissible within the military that which would be constitutionally impermissible outside it… Speech [in any form] that is protected in the civil population may nonetheless undermine the effectiveness of response to command.  If it does, it is constitutionally unprotected.” (Emphasis added) Parker v. Levy, 417 U.S. 733, 1974

 

In other words, if you want a Bible on the POW/MIA table you have to include the Tanakh, Koran, representations of other religions and atheism, in order to be in compliance.

 

The above laws must be obeyed by our military.

Treaty of Tripoli took effect as the law of the land on June 10, 1797; a mere 8 years since our Constitution:

“As the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion…”

 

The Constitution reflects our founder’s views of a secular government protecting the freedom of any belief or unbelief.

 

The historian, Robert Middlekauff, observed, “The idea that the Constitution expressed a moral view seems absurd. There were no genuine evangelicals in the Convention, and there were no heated declarations of Christian piety.”

 

“The Salem witchcraft was the rock on which the theocracy shattered”. George Lincoln Burr (1857 – 1938), Professor of History and Librarian at Cornell University

 

“Í am for freedom of religion and against all maneuvers to bring about a legal ascendancy of one sect over another.”

Thomas Jefferson’s letter to Elbridge Gerry January 26, 1799

 

“Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, then that of blindfolded fear.”
Thomas Jefferson, letter to Peter Carr, August 10, 1787

 

“History, I believe, furnishes no example of a priest-ridden people maintaining a free civil government. This marks the lowest grade of ignorance of which their civil as well as religious leaders will always avail themselves for their own purposes.”

Thomas Jefferson in letter to Alexander von Humboldt, December 6, 1813

“The United States of America have exhibited, perhaps, the first example of governments erected on the simple principles of nature; and if men are now sufficiently enlightened to disabuse themselves of artifice, imposture, hypocrisy, and superstition, they will consider this event as an era in their history. Although the detail of the formation of the American governments is at present little known or regarded either in Europe or in America, it may hereafter become an object of curiosity. It will never be pretended that any persons employed in that service had interviews with the gods, or were in any degree under the influence of Heaven, more than those at work upon ships or houses, or laboring in merchandise or agriculture; it will forever be acknowledged that these governments were contrived merely by the use of reason and the senses.”
John Adams, “A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America” 1787-1788

“If I could conceive that the general government might ever be so administered as to render the liberty of conscience insecure, I beg you will be persuaded, that no one would be more zealous than myself to establish effectual barriers against the horrors of spiritual tyranny, and every species of religious persecution.”
George Washington, letter to the United Baptist Chamber of Virginia, May 1789

“Christianity neither is, nor ever was a part of the common law.”
Thomas Jefferson, letter to Dr. Thomas Cooper, February 10, 1814

“The civil government functions with complete success by the total separation of the Church from the State.”
James Madison, 1819, Writings, 8:432, quoted from Gene Garman, “Essays In Addition to America’s Real Religion”

“Strongly guarded as is the separation between Religion and Government in the Constitution of the United States, the danger of encroachment by Ecclesiastical Bodies, may be illustrated by precedents already furnished in their short history.” 

James Madison; Monopolies, Perpetuities, Corporations, Ecclesiastical Endowments

 

“God has appointed two kinds of government in the world, which are distinct in their nature, and ought never to be confounded together; one of which is called civil, the other ecclesiastical government.”
Isaac Backus, An Appeal to the Public for Religious Liberty, 1773

 

“During almost fifteen centuries has the legal establishment of Christianity been on trial. What have been its fruits? More or less in all places, pride and indolence in the Clergy, ignorance and servility in the laity; in both, superstition, bigotry and persecution.

What influence, in fact, have ecclesiastical establishments had on society? In some instances they have been seen to erect a spiritual tyranny on the ruins of the civil authority; on many instances they have been seen upholding the thrones of political tyranny; in no instance have they been the guardians of the liberties of the people. Rulers who wish to subvert the public liberty may have found an established clergy convenient auxiliaries. A just government, instituted to secure and perpetuate it, needs them not.”

James Madison 1785 Memorial and Remonstrance against Religious Assessments

 

“Where the preamble declares, that coercion is a departure from the plan of the holy author of our religion, an amendment was proposed by inserting “Jesus Christ,” so that it would read ‘A departure from the plan of Jesus Christ, the holy author of our religion;’ the insertion was rejected by the great majority, in proof that they meant to comprehend, within the mantle of its protection, the Jew and the Gentile, the Christian and Mohammedan, the Hindoo and Infidel of every denomination.”

As Thomas Jefferson wrote in his Autobiography, in reference to the Virginia Act for Religious Freedom

 

According to our Founding Fathers, the Constitution is not based on Christianity or biblical law.

 

Your anti-Semitism is coming through loud and clear and a lot of military personnel, soldiers, volunteers and supporters will know it as soon as I respond to your email and it is sent by an email blast to our liaisons on almost every base in the world.

 

Check out the military people that don’t agree with you:

 

Board Member:

Major William E. Barker

 

Advisory Board Members:

Edie Disler– PhD, Lt Col (Ret), is a 25 year veteran of the Air Force who served as an ICBM crewmember, an Executive Support Officer to the Secretary of Defense, a conventional arms control inspector, a speechwriter, and USAFA faculty professor.

Robert S. Dotson–Retired brigadier general.

Robert T. Herres– A Naval Academy graduate with a 36 year career in the United States Air Force, he also served a three-year assignment as Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the first to hold that position. (December 1, 1932 – July 24, 2008)

Kristen Leslie – An Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling at Yale Divinity School and consultant to the United States Air Force Academy on religious matters.

Eagle Man, Ed McGaa – Is an enrolled Oglala Sioux tribal member, OST 15287. After serving in Korea, he earned an undergraduate degree from St. Johns University, MN. He then later rejoined the Marine Corps to become a fighter pilot.

Rev. MeLinda Morton – An ordained minister of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA). She is a former Chaplain in the United States Air Force, most recently serving at the United States Air Force Academy.

George Reed – A faculty member in the School of Leadership and Education Sciences at the University of San Diego. Before joining the faculty in 2007 he served for 27 years as a military police officer including six as the Director of Command and Leadership Studies at the U.S. Army War College.

AA “Tony” Verrengia  – A retired Air Force Brigadier General, He was a Master Navigator that served in air transport operations positions for many years.

John Whiteside – He is one of only a few military aviators to possess both Senior Command Air Force wings and aircraft carrier qualified Naval Aviator wings, in addition to having been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism in combat during Operation Desert Storm.

Lawrence Wilkerson – Distinguished Visiting Professor of Government and Public Policy at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, VA. His last position in government was as Secretary of State Colin Powell’s Chief of Staff (2002-05).

I will pray for you.

 

Pastor Joan

MRFF Advisory Board Member


 

Dear (name withheld) –

I’m addressing you by the title you provided in your email, on the assumption that it’s a legitimate one and not just a self-designed honorific. Frankly, I struggle with the notion that you might have rightly earned that rank in the US Armed Forces, because your email is full of so much venom, hate, and ignorance. Could it be that an actual Colonel is one of the branches of the US military would actually send a note that includes the words, “go to hell Jew boy and rot!”?  I would hope that is not possible, but perhaps it is so.
If it is true, then perhaps your nasty note can serve as confirmation and proof that the efforts of the MRFF are appropriate and necessary.
You don’t say whether you are a Christian — your choice of language would suggest not, but maybe you still claim to be one.  I’m a lifelong, committed Christian myself, as well as a USAF Academy graduate (’85) and a veteran USAF officer.
You suggest that the inclusion of a Christian Bible and scripture quote as part of the MIA table is “not bothering anyone”. You ignore the fact that a significant portion of both current and former US military members are not Christian. And you ignore the fact that not all of the MIAs and others who are remembered by displays such as this table are not Christian.
Even from the standpoint on my own personal beliefs, the Christian imagery doesn’t bother me at all. But from the perspective of someone who swore to support and defend the Constitution of the United States, it concerns me a great deal. This is not a personal Bible that some service member has in his possession – this is an organized, officially sanctioned statement that gives prominence to a particular sectarian religious belief, and that is inappropriate.
It’s likely that none of what I’ve shared is finding its way through your hard head and into your harder heart, but I’m always hopeful.
Peace,
Mike Challman
Christian, USAF veteran, MRFF supporter

Dear (name withheld) –

 

I am writing in response to your February 29, 2016 email to the Military Religious Freedom Foundation (“MRFF”).  Since you are clearly a fan of “kicking ass and taking names,” please allow me to do just that.

 

You ask, “Who the fuck are you to push for the Bible to be removed” from the POW/MIA display.  To answer your question, we are the voice of over 45,000 soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, cadets, and veterans who suffer wrongful religious discrimination, persecution, and proselytizing.  We received multiple complaints about the Bible being included in the display – the majority of which came from veterans who identify as Christians – and we acted accordingly.

 

The Establishment Clause of the First Amendment prohibits any state actor, including the military, from endorsing any religion over others, or endorsing religion over non-religion.  Including a Bible in a display honoring service members clearly endorses Christianity, therefore violating the Constitution.  Contrary to your claim that we have “dishonored every POW/MIA service member on the rolls,” our swift action to remove the Bible from the display honors everything for which our service members fight.  We work tirelessly to ensure that all brave men and women in uniform enjoy the constitutional rights they sacrifice so much to protect for the rest of us – I cannot imagine a better use of our legal experience.  That, sir, is who we are.

 

I sincerely appreciate your service to our country, but I respectfully disagree that your experience allows you to conclusively state, “there are no atheists when the bullets are flying and mortars and rockets are incoming.”  I assure you that many Atheists make the sacrifices required of military service and have endured combat situations, as have service members practicing a variety of non-Christian religious faiths.  Even if your statement had any factual basis or you somehow had the authority to declare the religious views of all past, present, and future service members, it is irrelevant.  The Constitution forbids such an endorsement of religion regardless of whether most, or even all, service members practice that religion.

 

While I have no doubt that you are an expert on hand jobs, you are certainly not an expert on constitutional law.  You may consider our legal expertise to be “pansy ass” and “wasted,” but we fight every day to protect the constitutional rights of all military service members.  What have you done lately?

 

Sincerely,

 

Tobanna Barker

MRFF Legal Affairs Coordinator


 

Dear (name withheld) –

First off, I want to say that your nasty and profane email does little to suggest that you are offering a well thought out and intelligent argument. But let’s assume that your intentions are good and it’s just your communication skills that are lacking.
Putting aside your unfair critique of Mikey Weinstein’s honorable military service, you should know that there are many MRFF supporters and clients who have “served downrange”. Those patriots will tell you that there are, in truth, atheists, Christians, Muslims, and believers/unbelievers of many stripes who have served, and who serve today, under fire and at great personal sacrifice.
Honorable service and selfless sacrifice are not the sole domain of Christians.
In my view, and I am a Christian myself, what dishonors “every POW/MIA service member on the rolls” is to suggest that the sacrifice of Christians is more noteworthy than the sacrifice of non-Christians.
Peace,
Mike Challman
Christian, USAF veteran, MRFF supporter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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