Religion in the Military

Dear MRFF,

Please change your name to the far more accurate, “Military Freedom From Religion Foundation.” You, Mikey are a jerk. You’re likely one of those ignoramuses that believe that Separation of Church and State is in the Bill of Rights. It isn’t, the phrase appeared in a private letter from Thomas Jefferson and has been taken wholly out of context. Like it or not, Bud, we are a Christian Nation, always have been, always will be despite the likes of you. Get your heathen attitudes out of my military. BTW I did two tours in Vietnam. Were you even in the military? I doubt it. You’re just another liberal asshole.

(name withheld)


Dear (name withheld),

Thank you for your note to MRFF.

One has only to Google “The Separation of Church and State” to get a large number of articles relating to that separation. It is real and has protected the citizens of the United States for many years. There are a number of US Supreme court decisions and rulings pertaining to it.

As it relates to the Military, the US Supreme Court ruled in the 1971 decision on Lemon Vs. Kurzman, that government, including Public Education and the Armed Forces may not promote, recommend or proselytize one religion over another or religion over non-religion.

Despite Christianity’s majority the United States is not a “Christian Nation.” America was founded as a secular nation in which all religions may flourish but none dominate.

I, too, did two tours of combat duty in Vietnam as a USAF combat rescue pilot and Mr. Weinstein spent 11 years in the Air Force Judge Advocates Office and three years as White House Counsel during President Reagan’s terms in office.

Assholes come in a variety of definitions. Your assholeness comes from a deep lack of knowledge and unreasonable beliefs. You have covered what you lack in education with religious blather thinking that you have successfully communicated. Well you have not.

Time to hit the library John and see if you can’t bring yourself up to date with what is really happening in America.
Rick Baker
Capt. USAF (Ret)
MRFF Volunteer

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2 Comments

  1. Constitution Defender

    Rick Baker,

    It is nice to know that you weren’t able to refute the author’s point of the Separation of Church and State not being anywhere in the Bill of Rights. It is also nowhere in the Constitution.

    In the spirit of educating both yourself and the MRFF, the Constitution dealt with the concept of preventing a particular religion from being sponsored or enacted by the government. It did not forbid religious expression in the framework of government operations. For to take your strict separatist interpretation on its face, the government could easily discriminate and exclude religious people and groups from government affairs and promote atheists into government positions over people of religious beliefs. Doing this would be unconstitutional and is what the MRFF is currently advocating. This was not the intention of the Founding Fathers, and a simple Google search from yourself would reveal this fact that the nation was founded with the intention of it being in concert with religious principles – and primarily Judeo-Christian religious principles.

    The Treaty of Tripoli doesn’t refute the intentions of the Founders, for the context of the Tripoli Treaty was to appear benign to the muslim nations.

    Plus, the original Treaty of Tripoli that is often cited by atheists was broken, and a new Treaty of Tripoli was created (1805) that did not contain the phrase about the US not being founded on the Christian religion.

    To the chagrin of hateful atheists like Mikey Weinstein, virtually the entire framework of the US was founded by Christians. I would venture over 90% of our forefathers were Christians. Any research countering this claim is welcomed. Christianity settled the West. Many aspects of the Constitution are derived from biblical doctrine. The first Treaty of Tripoli doesn’t refute these historical facts.

    It does not take much intellectual capacity to call the original poster an “asshole,” instead of attempting to refute his points, of which you failed to do. It just reinforces the image of the MRFF as being the intolerant, ignorant, and hateful organization that it is.

    I just refuted your points and provided, yet again, clarification for your misguided views on America.

    Mikey Weinstein is an asshole for persecuting these poor Christian Cadets who are trying to serve their country while assuming all the responsibilities that their undergrad study requires of them. Mikey Weinstein clearly has an irrational obsession and you are wasting your time by attacking our own, instead of addressing real, tangible threats to our nation.

    It is not my problem that misguided liberals such as yourself are so intolerant and hateful of other people’s beliefs. This fact is on full display with this latest witch hunt conducted by the MRFF.

    Cheers,

    Constitution Defender

  2. Lance

    The MRFF censors intelligent debate on its website.

    I countered the lies that were put forth from the moderators, and my response was deleted. The MRFF only keeps up the most vulger posts and hides the ones that intellectually incapacitate its arguments.

    I will try again, but the moderators will most likely erase my message because it undercuts their argument. The hypocrisy of this organization is on full display. They censor free speech, yet claim to defend the Constitution…

    …In the spirit of educating both yourself and the MRFF, the Constitution dealt with the concept of preventing a particular religion from being sponsored or enacted by the government. It did not forbid religious expression in the framework of government operations. For to take your strict separatist interpretation on its face, the government could easily discriminate and exclude religious people and groups from government affairs and promote atheists into government positions over people of religious beliefs. Doing this would be unconstitutional and is what the MRFF is currently advocating. This was not the intention of the Founding Fathers, and a simple Google search from yourself would reveal this fact that the nation was founded with the intention of it being in concert with religious principles – and primarily Judeo-Christian religious principles.

    The Treaty of Tripoli doesn’t refute the intentions of the Founders, for the context of the Tripoli Treaty was to appear benign to the muslim nations.

    Plus, the original Treaty of Tripoli that is often cited by atheists was broken, and a new Treaty of Tripoli was created (1805) that did not contain the phrase about the US not being founded on the Christian religion.

    To the chagrin of atheists, virtually the entire framework of the US was founded by Christians. I would venture over 90% of our forefathers were Christians. Any research countering this claim is welcomed. Christianity settled the West. Many aspects of the Constitution are derived from biblical doctrine. The first Treaty of Tripoli doesn’t refute these historical facts.

    Stating these undeniable facts does not make me a “religious extremist.”

    Cheers,

    Lance

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