a beautiful poem about God and Soldiers

From:  (name withheld)
Date: September 9, 2019 at 6:28:04 PM MDT
To: Mikey Weinstein <[email protected]militaryreligiousfreedom.org>
Subject: a beautiful poem about God and Soldiers
God and the soldier
All men adore
In time of trouble,
And no more;
For when war is over
And all things righted,
God is neglected –

The old soldier slighted.
Mister Weinstein I am a retired Soldier who served 25 years. I am proud to say that one of my duties was as a chaplain’s assistant in Desert Storm. I am not going to curse or use anti-Semitic slurs like so many do. However, I want you to know that I disagree with what you do. I think you and your organization are wrong. There are a lot of serious problems confronting our veterans and yet you worry about little things like Bibles on tables. Why don’t you do something to REALLY help instead of acting like a glorified playground bully.
(name withheld)

Response from MRFF Supporter Lori Capps

On Sep 9, 2019, at 9:04 PM, Lori Capps  wrote:

(name withheld)-

Is there anything in particular you disagree with, or is it the organization as a whole? You say it’s “acting like a glorified playground bully.”, however, it’s the bullies we are against. It is those bullied in the form of proselytization, no matter the denomination, we help. Are you aware of all the ways in which we help service members both active and retired? It seems you are misinformed or simply aren’t educated on what it is we do. We are aware and concerned with all issues our clients are confronted with. I’d be happy to answer any questions you may have to help clarify. 

-Lori


Response from MRFF Founder and President Mikey Weinstein

From: Mikey Weinstein <[email protected]militaryreligiousfreedom.org>
Date: September 9, 2019 at 7:00:46 PM MDT
To: (name withheld)
Subject: Re: a beautiful poem about God and Soldiers
Thanks for taking the time to reach out (name withheld)… Don’t congratulate your self too much for not using anti-Jewish slurs or profanity or threats… We got a lot of that as you know and it’s nice to see that you didn’t do that however it is pretty arrogant and imperious of you to describe the Bible on the table as a “little thing”… We represent 17 veterans and their families on this matter at the Manchester Veterans Administration;m Medical Center… The majority of those clients happen to be Christians themselves… We represent well over 65,000 members of the military and veterans here at the Military Religious Freedom Foundation… About 95% of them are Christians… Over 80% of our staff, Volunteer and paid, are also are practicing Christians… You need to understand my friend that what is a “little thing“ is in the eye of the beholder as interpreted by the US Constitution, it’s construing federal and state caselaw as well as all regulations that pertain to the Veterans Administration; and the Department of Defense… Maybe think about this a little more before you start throwing stones calling people bullies who are not bullies…I have no more time to spend replying here… Perhaps others connected with our foundation can go into more detail… Thank you again for your input… Mikey Weinstein…Founder and President Military Religious Freedom Foundation

Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member Mike Farrell
On Sep 9, 2019, at 11:43 PM, Mike  wrote:

 

Hi (name withheld),

 

I see that Mikey has responded to you, so I just thought I’d add a quick thought or two.

 

You are, of course, welcome to disagree with our position. Many do, most of them not as relatively calmly as you did, though you slipped a bit with the ‘bully’ line.

 

Like you, few understand that we are not against religious belief, we are protecting it. We agree there are many serious issues facing veterans and many of us are working in other areas attempting to deal with those as well. But as Mikey says, protecting the freedom of religious or non-religious belief of the women and men in our military is no small thing.

 

You’re looking in the wrong direction, (name withheld). The bullies are those who insist on forcing their particular  belief system on everyone regardless of belief. If you served as a chaplain’s assistant, I have to assume you found some who didn’t share your chaplain’s particular faith. I hope neither you nor he insisted they do so. And I also hope, if you or your chaplain were/are Christians, neither of you felt it appropriate to put a Bible or a cross on a gurney to honor a fallen or a wounded comrade without knowing his personal preference or belief.

 

You see, that’s what we’re concerned about. As you might imagine, if the book on the table had been a Quaran, there would be people, mostly Christians, screaming bloody murder. That’s why the original design of the POW/MIA tables had no religious artifact on them. People should not presume in honoring the lost and fallen. We honor those of all faiths, all belief systems, including non-belief. To do otherwise is both presumptuous and wrong.

 

Mike Farrell

(MRFF Board of Advisors)


On Tuesday, September 10, 2019, 04:17, (name withheld) wrote:

Lori
  Thanks for taking the time to write me back. I guess I’m just old fashioned but to me at least the flag and the cross go hand in hand. I started going back to church a few years ago and I fee it’s made me a better person. To me were one nation under God and I look around at all the problems were having and I think its because people don’t have God in their lives. I go to a VA hospital near my home and they have a beautiful MIA table with a BIBLE and I always put my hand on it and bow my head for a moment. I’ve read a lot of accounts of guys who were prisoners of war in Vietnam and other conflicts and do you know what Lori? Almost every single one mentioned how faith in the almighty got them through their hellish ordeal.
    I don’t know if you were ever in the military but theres an old adage no athiests in foxholes. I was 22 when I was called up to serve in Desert Storm and I will tell you this the months I was deployed I prayed more then I ever did in my life and God got me through. I don’t think Soldiers should be “forced” to go to religious services if they don’t want to and I agree with you there, but I love the MIA table and I think that Bible should be a part of it. 
   I’m sorry people write you with such hateful words. I always try to “disagree” without being “disagreeable”. Best wishes and, if you don’t mind, God bless you
 
(name withheld)

Response from MRFF Supporter Lori Capps
On Sep 10, 2019, at 6:11 AM, Lori Capps  wrote:

 

(name withheld)- 

 
I think it’s wonderful you have found that personal relationship with God. Many people feel the same way about it making them a better person. Please consider those that have found that relationship through Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, et al. If we aren’t comfortable seeing those texts on a table that represents our friends, think how they feel seeing a Bible. Have you considered bringing your own and reciting a prayer or preferred scripture at the table? Thank you for replying and explaining more about why you feel so strongly. Best wishes and God bless. 
 
Regards, 
Lori, MRFF Supporter

Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member John Compere
From: John Compere
Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 2:00 AM
To:  (name withheld)
Cc: Military Religious Freedom Foundation <[email protected]militaryreligiousfreedom.org>
Subject: Re: a beautiful poem about God and Soldiers

(name withhekd),
 
Thank you for your military service & civil communication. I am responding because I am a retired soldier who served 26 years.
 
The purpose for the non-religious POW/MIA displays is & has always been remembrance (of them) – not religion (someone else’s religious scripture version). The Department of Veteran Affairs medical centers are for all veterans of all beliefs (religious & non-religious) seeking health care. They are not exclusive worship centers for some Christians. Religious scripture versions can & should be placed in hospital chapels for those who wish to see, read, use or worship them.
 
To publicly promote one religion over all others by placing a religious scripture version dominantly in the middle of non-religious POW/MIA displays in the public foyer of government facilities violates the US Constitution 1st Amendment as well as American law separating church & state. Our secular government is prohibited from promoting or endorsing a religion & government neutrality is required regarding religion (neither pro-religious nor anti-religious but religious-neutral). Jesus even separated religion & government (Mark 12-17).
 
The Military Religious Freedom Foundation respects the Constitution, law of our land & right of every veteran to determine, enjoy & practice his or her own beliefs (religious or non-religious) without our government forcing someone else’s religion version on them. We have represented over 65,000 military members (96% Christians) pro bono who requested their constitutional right to freedom of religion (to which all Americans are entitled) be respected & protected. I can assure you these patriotic men & women do not believe the Foundation is “acting like a glorified playground bully”.
 
1st President & Commander-in-Chief GEORGE WASHINGTON even recognized the problem –
 
“It has been suggested that [the military chaplaincy] has a tendency to introduce religious disputes into the Army, which above all things should be avoided, and in may instances would compel men to a mode of Worship which they do not profess.”
 
Most Sincerely,
Brigadier General John Compere, US Army (Retired)
Disabled American Veteran (Veteran Era)
Advisory Board Member, Military Religious Freedom Foundation (80% Christians)

 

On Tuesday, September 10, 2019, 10:49:32 AM CDT, (name withheld) wrote:
Sir
   You served one year more then I did. I must admit I wish I could get a pension check like yours! I guess I’m old fashioned but to me love of God and country, flag and the cross, go hand in hand. When I was in Desert Storm they told us to trust in God and believe me I prayed more then I ever had. There are no athiests in foxholes. I spent a month in the hospital at Fort Sill in 2006 because I had something called compartment syndrome in my leg. I almost lost it and am 90% disabled to this day. I believe God got me through that ordeal and I thank him every day. My most prized possession from home when I was in Desert Storm was a little religious medal my grandfather had carried in WWII, my grandmother gave it to me.
   Your organization is right to tell commanders and others they have no right to FORCE religion on their soldiers. You can’t make someone believe in God that’s a personal choice. I just don’t agree with taking Bibles of those MIA tables or taking Nativity Scenes out of PXs or telling soldiers they can’t include Bible verses in emails. I went to a dedication ceremony this weekend for a Korean war memorial and the wonderful old veteran that had it built said that a Soldier wears God’s uniform as well.
   I know you think I’m an old fashioned fuddy duddy but I want you to know that some of the people who write to you and use anti semitic slurs and terrible language are wrong as well. Disagree but don’t be disagreeable about it. Good sir and, if you don’t mind me saying, God bless.
(name withheld)
US Army (Retired)

Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member John Compere

On Sep 10, 2019, at 10:02 AM, John Compere  wrote:

(name withheld),
 
Thank you again for your continuing civil communication.
 
The MRFF proudly & patriotically represents without charge military members who do not want our government to public impose someone else’s religion or religious scripture on them in government facilities because they want their right to religious freedom under our Constitution respected & protected. Religious scripture versions can be & are appropriately placed in the chapels for anyone who wants to see, use, read or worship them.
 
The tradition of POW/MIA “remembrance” began & continued for years without the intrusion of religion or religious scripture & should remain as originated.
 
And, God bless you also.
 
John

Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member Martin France
On Sep 10, 2019, at 6:51 PM, Martin France  wrote:

(name withheld), as a member of the MRFF’s Advisory Board, I occasionally answer emails sent to Mikey and the MRFF.  I hope you don’t mind if I take a few minutes to respond to yours.  I’ll start with your poem.  Short and seemingly deep, it presumes the old saw that there are “no Atheists in a foxhole” (or that, during war, all pray to a singular common god) is truthful.  In fact, there are thousands of Atheists, non-thesists, multi-theists, and non-Abrahamic religious members of our military and their families that don’t pray to your god.  Moreover, even during a war, not all citizens esteem a god or even soldiers (e.g., Vietnam).  That’s just a fact.  The poem may seem important to you and confirm your beliefs, but it proves nothing to me–as I don’t find it accurate in any way.  Another point, I see esteem for current and former members of the military (at least in the US) as high as it’s probably been since WWII.  Just say something negative about “supporting the troops” on social media and see the response.
You’re free to disagree with Mikey and question his and the MRFF’s priorities, but defending the Constitution that you and I once took and oath to defend–and the rights of others who’ve done the same–doesn’t really seem trivial to me.  The MRFF can’t solve ALL of the problems that veterans face.  That’s not our mission.  Our (relatively narrow but vital) mission is to support the Constitutional rights of all members of the military (past, present, and future) to serve in a professional environment in which Constitutional rights of all are respected.  That means that commanders are held to standards set by regulations (e.g., AF Instruction 1-1 is a good example) and that they can serve without bias concerning their beliefs (or lack thereof).  Part of that means that one should not just ASSUME that EVERY member of the military or every veteran ascribes to your narrow view of religion (one of over 3,000 documented human religions).  It means that we don’t assume that EVERY POW/MIA drew or draws strength from the one religious text you view as holy (when there are hundreds of others that are higher priority for other veterans).  It means that a subordinate shouldn’t be subjected to proselytizing by commanders or pressured by peers to conform–or feel like they need to go through the motions to be accepted.  It means that the MRFF wants all in the military and in veteran’s facilities to know that there isn’t one single religious perspective that should be considered a necessary condition for respect, nor a sufficient condition or qualification for advancement or promotion or treatment.  The Bible on the table infuriates me probably in a manner that would be similar to how you might feel if a friend of yours (who was Christian) was just assumed to be Jewish and buried under a Star of David because his last name was Meyer or Cohan, or buried under a Star and Crescent if his last name Hussein.  The fact is a Bible is not the proper symbol of moral or spiritual strength for a display that represents ALL POWs/MIAs in the same manner that an Evangelical Christian prayer shouldn’t be forced on a crowd or unit in a professional setting outside of a (voluntarily attended) chapel or church service.  It might not mean much to you, but then that’s because it’s an environment in which you feel comfortable.  The fish don’t notice the water, my friend–it’s not a big deal to you.  For those who’ve chosen to crawl out of the water and prefer the air and sunshine, who’ve felt for years like we were drowning in a sea of religious bias, bigotry, and pressure, I can most heartily say, it is a VERY big deal to us.  We’ll fight this fight.  You can keep swimming.  If you find some other way to help veterans, then good for you.
Thanks for your 25 years of service.
Marty France
37+ Year Active Duty Veteran, USAF (Retired)
Member, MRFF Advisory Board

Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member Ted Furlow

Dear (name withheld),

 

I read your letter to Mikey, and I appreciate both your opinions and the poem.  My experience with this response business is that the writer rarely notes their correct e-mail address, so not knowing if you will ever read this I am still motivated to respond.

 

When you served in Desert Storm, you defended the rights of our democracy, rights that are enshrined and maintained in the Constitution and its related documents.  The Founders, all God fearers, wrote specific language to insure that democracy would be free of religious entanglements.  While we have expansive rights of free worship and religious choice, there are no provisions for a state related religion.  Many Christian today believe otherwise, and wish to overlay their faith on others in a mistaken sense of piety.

 

Our country is an amazing mix of many religious cultures and beliefs.  We all have the individual right to express our person faith, evangelize that faith, and to live it daily, but the government in any of its many forms cannot and  should not.  No matter how incidental or innocent, religion expressed by the government is a form of establishment, and is disallowed in our democracy.  In the military, folks who cross that line do so under the color of authority and violate the rights that you defended in Desert Storm.  We all have a right to tell our story, but we can’t let the government do our talking for us.

 

I am a life – long participating Christian.  My Christianity defines who I am, and my relationship with God is the primary blessing in my life.  What MRFF does is not a little thing, it defends my religious freedom and prevents government from telling me that I must worship or believe in a certain way.  Mikey isn’t anti-vet or anti-military, he is pro-democracy.

 

Remember why you put the uniform on in the first place.

 

And yes, this is my e-mail address, feel free to write me back.

 

Best,

 

Ted Furlow

MRFF Advisory Board


 

 

 

 


On Tuesday, September 10, 2019, 10:49:32 AM CDT, (name withheld) wrote:
Sir
   You served one year more then I did. I must admit I wish I could get a pension check like yours! I guess I’m old fashioned but to me love of God and country, flag and the cross, go hand in hand. When I was in Desert Storm they told us to trust in God and believe me I prayed more then I ever had. There are no athiests in foxholes. I spent a month in the hospital at Fort Sill in 2006 because I had something called compartment syndrome in my leg. I almost lost it and am 90% disabled to this day. I believe God got me through that ordeal and I thank him every day. My most prized possession from home when I was in Desert Storm was a little religious medal my grandfather had carried in WWII, my grandmother gave it to me.
   Your organization is right to tell commanders and others they have no right to FORCE religion on their soldiers. You can’t make someone believe in God that’s a personal choice. I just don’t agree with taking Bibles of those MIA tables or taking Nativity Scenes out of PXs or telling soldiers they can’t include Bible verses in emails. I went to a dedication ceremony this weekend for a Korean war memorial and the wonderful old veteran that had it built said that a Soldier wears God’s uniform as well.
   I know you think I’m an old fashioned fuddy duddy but I want you to know that some of the people who write to you and use anti semitic slurs and terrible language are wrong as well. Disagree but don’t be disagreeable about it. Good sir and, if you don’t mind me saying, God bless.
(name withheld)
US Army (Retired)

 

 

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15 Comments

  1. Grey One talks sass

    With one breath the letter writer says they don’t want to force religion on people and the next they insist the cross and the flag go together (better than chocolate and peanut butter they didn’t say).

    Also they repeat a familiar mantra – no atheists in foxholes. Where have I heard that lately? It will come to me I’m sure.

    The MRFF is a national treasure, one I’m grateful exists in the here/now.

  2. GreyWolf

    Grey one we are one nation under God and I find your smarmy attitude very offensive. Our military men and women who have served our nation and who serve today all over the world wiling to fight and die for freedom THEY are our national treasures not the MRFF.

  3. Grey One talks sass

    GreyWolf,

    So like a binary thinker – there can be only One!

    Why can’t both be treasures?

    Smarmy attitude you say? (ingratiating and wheedling in a way that is perceived as insincere or excessive.)

    Please, would you explain in words my meager brain can understand how I may do better?

    ^^^^That’s smarmy you vocabulary challenged person.

    You may not agree with me and that’s the beauty of the USA. However, as we are civilized you (and I) have to abide by the Constitution and Amendments. As people who live here we are equal under the law. That means keep your idea of a deity to yourself. Easy Peasy amirite?

  4. Grey One talks sass

    Oh oh oh, I meant to add…..

    I keep forgetting. To Christian Nationalists the triplets of discrimination, oppression, and hatred are central to their idea of practicing their religion.

    Personally I find hatred exhausting. Love is easier on the heart and the brain. I can love the human while not liking their life choices. Again, easy peasy.

  5. GreyWolf

    Your use of baby talk indicates to me your brain is somewhat wanting. I believe in a God that loves everyone just the same Jew, Catholic, Muslum or Christian. The best religion is the one that brings you closest to God. The Bible doesn’t promote one religion over another it is just Gods word that ALL of us need to heed. I do not have any hate in my heart. I did some research and learned the facts. The MRFF claims it represents 65 thousand people. Do you know that is less then one third of one percent of all active, reserve and former military. Kids use to be able to pray in school and learn about our great country that was founded on faith. George Washington prayed in the snow at Valley Forge. People like you want to take God out of everything and we all need him in our lives and that includes you.

  6. Grey One talks sass

    GreyWolf,

    Perhaps you should pay closer attention to your moniker. You say you don’t hate but your scent betrays you. I’m going to bet the tone of our conversation would change if two hot topics were raised.

    The God of the Christian Bible says right off the bat that they are a vain and jealous god and that no one should worship any others before them.

    As a child I knew that meant other deities existed and the god of the holy book I was raised on admitted it, first chapter! Who else was out there? I needed to know more so I went to the Library. As I got older I realized how dysfunctional a vain and jealous god is and how one tries always but fails to live up to their expectations. I started to walk away and I’ve never been tempted to return.

    I must tell you, the Christian Bible (King James Version) promotes only Christianity. I know the other two branches of the Abraham family use pieces (with the Jews possessing the originals) but their holy books are theirs and crafted with their faith In mind. The books aren’t interchangeable.

    Still with the we are SOOOOOO persecuted. No one is ‘taking away your bibles’, at least not in approved places. And a student is allowed to carry a bible until their arms fall off if that’s their hearts desire. Always.

    What can’t happen, and I don’t know why you don’t see this, is a teacher, a person in a position of authority, anyone on duty while working in any capacity for the government (State, Federal, or Military) cannot and may not promote their faith to others. That, in plain terms, is The Church stepping over the wall into State territory.

    No means no. You and your hide bound faith don’t have the answers for me and my life. And, wolf puppy, you presume too much to assume I don’t know the face and voice of The Creator.

    I sound like a baby my left buttock. Perhaps it was so you’d understand my words. You do appear to be stupid. After all, you refuse to learn to share. That’s not ignorant. That’s dumb.

    I didn’t want Justice until Equality was denied. Ccj

  7. G

    The guy who sent the poem to the MRFF was Old Soldier since he stated that he had served 25 years in the military, was in Desert Storm and was a chaplain assistant.in the previous threads on this website.

  8. Grey One talks sass

    For a brief moment I thought Grey Wolf and Old Soldier were the same. Still could be as they both came into MRFF’s house with their We are a Christian Nation garbage; twin ideologies etc.

    Both claim to have researched the issue of Christianity in the USA, both came back with Political Religious Zealot talking points.

    Here’s a pro research tip for the future; if all research results confirm ones conclusion then the collection parameters aren’t set correctly.

    I was taught the way one tests ones hypothesis is to try and break it. Find everything that contradicts the premise and follow the data to the source. Ask who benefits from a decision. Follow the money if applicable. You know, be a scientist.

    The fact is, the USA was founded as a secular nation and since then Christianity in all its flavors has assumed privileges denied to others because of otherness.

    No more. Learn to share Grey Wolf and Old Soldier. You are not the only seat at the table. You never were but sure enjoyed pretending.

  9. Sage on the Hudson

    Ever live in an apartment where someone in the next unit is blasting his stereo so that you can’t read, watch TV, think or sleep?

    Does that guy next door have a right to play his stereo? Sure, but his rights end at the walls between his and everyone else’s apartments. The moment that sound penetrates into a unit that is not his, he’s violating others’ rights.

    So, whose rights take precedence? A clue: NOT those of the guy with the stereo.

    That’s exactly analogous to the Bible out on a table in facility whose operations are paid for by ALL taxpayers, not all of whom subscribe to the teachings of the religion whose Bible it is.

    So, again, whose rights take precedence? Another clue: not the people whose Bible that is.

    And I have an observation: those who think that strong-arming others and forcing their religion on them demonstrate by these actions and beliefs that they actually have scant faith. If your religion is the ultimate truth in the universe, don’t you think that people can and will find it in their own way and in their own good time? And that they will in the end be better, more judicious and charitable Christians for having done so?

  10. BlackHawkDown

    Sage on the Hudson
    That has got to be the dumbest argument I have ever heard! A Bible on a table doesn’t bother people like someone blasting a stereo. There are countless people who walk by those MIA displays every day see the Bible and take no offense. It should be majority rules. So what if it offends a couple dum dums. With all the problems facing our veterans, PTSD, homelessness, addiction, helping their families, veterans being mistreated at VA hospitals and you and the MRFF worry about a BIBLE on a table.

  11. Grey One talks sass

    BlackHawkDown (Who looks and sounds like OldSoldier and GreyWolf)

    Really, We The People are “dum dum’s“ because we find violations of the Constitution to be troublesome?

    If you really believed the majority should rule you’d be furious we have who we have as president. So, I’m thinking you only want majority rule when you are the majority, amirite?

    Go back to school BlackHawkDown. You need to retake your Civics and Social Studies classes.

    Sage, I thought your example of how Rights work to be clever and right on the mark. I will remember.

  12. G

    BlackHawkDown, if you think that the MRFF shouldn’t worry about a bible being on a table, then you shouldn’t be so uptight if the Bible is not allowed to be put on the table since a Bible will not solve the problems that the veterans are facing.

  13. OldSoldier

    I want to post a beautiful poem I saw concerning God in our childrens lives.

    Mary Had a Little Lamb

    Mary had a little Lamb,
    His fleece was white as snow.
    And everywhere that Mary went,
    The Lamb was sure to go.

    He followed her to school each day,
    When it wasn’t against the rules.
    He made the the children laugh and play
    To have the Lamb at school

    Then the rules changed one day,
    Against the law it became.
    To bring the Lamb of God to school
    Or even speak His name.

    Every day got worse and worse,
    And days turned into years.
    Instead of hearing children laugh and play,
    You heard them crying tears.

    What must we do to stop the crime,
    That’s in our schools today?
    Let the Lamb come back to school
    And teach our kids to pray.

  14. G

    You can’t bring a lamb to school due to health and safety regulations unless it is for a certain event.

    Children are crying these days due to violence at school, work, home, dealing with street gangs, police officers, dealing with hunger, poverty, inadequate educations, no good-paying jobs, lack of free/affordable medical and political, social, and economic inequality.

    How can a lamb teach a child to pray when he/she doesn’t speak the many languages and dialects of the human race? Furthermore, isn’t that the job of the parents, priests, and nuns to teach the kids how to pray?

  15. Grey One talks sass

    Old Soldier masks their theocratic ways with a children’s poem about prayer in school. Hello! – this is totally off topic! And Old Soldier will most likely reply with a version of what’s the harm with a little lamb? How can that offend?

    Old Soldier ‘says’ they support equality but then they post prose about their deity without a stated reason. I believe their goal is to flood what is known to Christian Nationalists as an atheist site with the language of their god.

    I know Old Solder can’t see the hypocrisy as with one breath they decry Sharia Law and the next insist Christian Nationalist propaganda be force fed to everyone so that all knees bow down in unison. The USA is a secular nation who (in theory) guarantees equality for all. No one is forcing out Christians but wow, they sure like to pretend they are being persecuted out of the country. Seriously, they need help with this persecution fetish. I’m thinking this can’t be healthy.

    Also (and too) I’ll be honest to say this wasn’t the Zombie Apocalypse I expected. How does that Multiverse thing work again?

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