Christmas Santa

  I am a 27 year US Army Veteran that served from 1971 to 2013 with 1 break of service.  I see that your organization promotes itself as standing for “Civil Rights.”  When you attack my faith and deny its presence due to the motto, “God Bless America”, you are violating my rights of religion and free speech.  I do not protest when you post atheist remarks which attack my beliefs. 
   What happened to common sense? Does only free speech apply to those of your ilk and kind? The 1st Amendment stands for than a self-promoted Attorney.  Your organization’s mission statement says that the Military is to be separate of Religion. I do agree that the United States Government should not recognize a single religion as stated in our Constitution, however, the framers of our Constitution did not omit the word, God, from it.                       Amendment I                                                                                         Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.
When I served on my second Iraq tour as an Enlisted Platoon Leader, we gave a pre-mission brief that closed with the Battalion’s Chaplain providing a prayer.  Those who did not express a belief were not forced to participate. 
   So when you deny and prevent those who have a belief in God from celebrating the Christmas Season, why couldn’t it be allowed as such things that are offensive to us?  There are two sides to a coin, not just the one you chose to represent.
V/R
(name withheld)

Response from MRFF Founder and President Mikey Weinstein
(name withheld), first I wanna thank you for your courteous and respectful email outeach… You would not believe some of the hateful stuff we get!!… Our foundation represents over 66,100 members of the US Armed Forces and Veterans… About 95% of them are practicing Christians and take their religion as seriously as you do… We have over 450 paid and volunteer staff here at the foundation… Well over 80% are practicing Christian to ALSO take their Christian faith as seriously as you do… I do not understand why you believe we are attempting to eradicate Christianity in the armed forces?!… I am not that religious but I am Jewish and very proud of it… Half of my own family is Christian… Now can you specify more a little please?…Thank you again for your balanced & good faith inquiry… Mikey Weinstein… Founder and president, Military Religious Freedom Foundation…

Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member Mike Farrell
Dear (name withheld),
 
I see Mikey has already responded to you, so I hope you have a somewhat better understanding of the situation. I’d just like to make a couple of points in addition.
 
One doesn’t have to read far into your message to see that you have, or perhaps had, the impression ours is an organization of anti-Christian atheists who hate God and religion and are busily promoting atheism. As Mikey has pointed out, that is not the case. The MRFF was formed when it became clear that there is an active attempt by by a group or sect of Christians who believe very passionately that theirs is the one and only true faith, that all other belief systems are false, and that it is their duty to spread their chosen faith to the world. One of their goals, in fact, is the make Christianity the official religion of the United States, and one of he parts of that is to make the U.S. military “Jesus’ Army.”
 
Now you may or may not believe that this can be the case, but our experience demonstrates it to be so. I personally have no problem with people having deeply felt, passionate convictions about whatever their belief system might be, but I think it’s only fair to acknowledge that others have just as much of a right to  their own.
 
For the people who attack us, the first line of assault is usually that we are atheists. Or communists. Or both. And then of course, because of Mikey’s name, we are Jews – often dirty, hooked-nosed, money-grubbing Jews who are Christ-killers. And of course there are variations on these ugly themes.
 
Mikey, being a lawyer, chose to combat this effort by forming an organization to support an understanding of America’s laws and its Constitution, and in particular to endorse and defend the separation of church and state, which allows true freedom of religion, one of the fundamental premises of our land. That premise, the separation of church and state, is the one most attacked by the sect described above, because it makes impossible the realization of their goal.
 
You see, the freedom of religious choice actually allows, by definition, the choice of no religion, which is anathema to the true believer.
 
Now, assuming you recognize that the premise of the organization is to ensure the freedom of religious or non-religious choice of all the women and men in our military, I hope you’ll also understand that we point out and stand against some things that might appear to you or to another Christian to be inconsequential, or you might see what we make an issue of as nit-picking, or silly, or, perhaps, anti-Christian. They are not.
 
One of the ways what I’ll call the ‘extremists’ move their project along is to take little steps that most people (most Americans who are religious being Christians) see as inoffensive or normal. So what if they want to add a Bible to a POW/MIA table, even though not all POWs and MIAs were Christians and the original POW/MIA tables did not include a religious artifact for that reason.
 
But the separation of church and state means that no official government body or organization can promote, promulgate, prefer or in any way show preference for one belief system over the others. While private groups, just like private people, acting on their own, are of course free to demonstrate their faith or practice their beliefs as they choose, within the limits of the law and military regulations, the government must be scrupulous in observing neutrality.
 
So, Santa Claus wearing a military uniform adorned with a badge saying “Christmas Force” and carrying a sign saying God Bless America may seem innocent fun to some, but to others it looks like Santa is an agent of the US Military and its Government and is praying to God.
 
That’s where we stand. I hope that helps.
 
Best,
 
Mike Farrell
(MRFF Board of Advisors)

I say again, if you represent yourselves as protectors of civil rights, then where is mine?  The Constitution states,”Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof. It doesn’t say no religion, its states the free exercise of belief, not just to atheists, but includes all other beliefs(Jewish, Christian, Muslim, et al).  It does not limit or set guidelines, CASE LAW does that.
   With what you are saying, then for the PX to sale Christmas Cards with Religious themes is a violation(Which is not true), and I DO NOT HAVE THE RIGHT TO PURCHASE(violation of my Civil Rights).  You are seeking to limit and omit God, period.  I do not seek to infringe others with my belief, so don’t try talking down to me with your agenda. I disagree with you and your organization and feel offended and insulted by it. Our Country is not ruled or ran by a few, but by the Majority, that vote and set laws, and not twist them.
V/R
(name withheld)

Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member Mike Farrell
On Dec 7, 2019, at 4:03 PM, Mike  wrote:
I don’t know if you’re being dense or just silly. The intent of the law is clearly established to mean the separation of church and state. And it does not say one has to have a

religion; that’s asinine.

The PX can sell what it chooses and people can buy what they choose, but it it’s a religious card you’ll note it doesn’t say or carry an insignia noting it is endorsed by the U.S. government.

You can disagree with us all you’d like. I’m sorry you’re offended or insulted by it, but I think that’s a result of your own thin skin rather than our protection of the freedom of belief.

Your last line exposes what I think is your bottom line: “the majority”. The majority of church-going Americans are Christians. Much as you might like it to be the case, that doesn’t mean

that ours is a Christian nation any more than it means everyone in it must be a Christian.

Mike Farrell

(MRFF Board of Advisors)


Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member Mike Farrell
On Dec 7, 2019, at 4:57 PM, Mike  wrote:
Sorry, (name withheld), but let’s be clear. I said, in response to your continuing unwillingness to comprehen the words I wrote, that “I don’t know if you’re being dense or just silly.” That’s the case,
if you choose to be insulted, be my guest, but I did not call you dense.

In fact I went to some lengths to explain, politely, as did Mikey, that the problem you find with our position is in your mind. You initiated the exchange with the charge that we

attacked your faith – “When you attack my faith… etc.” Need we go on with this?

If your bottom line, as appears to be the case, is that we are somehow disallowing “the free exercise” of your religion, I’m afraid you’re evincing a peculiarly reedy epidermis.

Bye now.

Mike Farrell
(MRFF Board of Advisors)

Response from MRFF Founder and President Mikey Weinstein
On 12/11/2019 2:30 PM, Michael L Weinstein wrote:
……Hi, (name withheld)…perhaps you recall Mike Farrell from M*A*S*H??…his recent answer below to another person may be of use to you…all best, Mikey Weinstein…head of MRFF

See comments below within Mr. Farrell’s comment. And, just because he served in a make believe series on TV doesn’t make him an expert on anything. In fact, the whole MASH series was an false representation of a unit that actually served in the US Army in Korea. The MASH actors were all liberals and readily expressed their liberals beliefs during the shows many season. But, I enjoyed the show and took it for the fiction it was. That still does not justify the poor representation it gave of men and women who actually served in a REAL MASH unit. And, I respect Mr. Farrell’s right to his opinion but I do not agree with his opinions and certainly do not accept him as some kind of expert just because he was in a TV series about the military. Which by the way had a Catholic priest, a very funny and enjoyable actor.
(name withheld)

 

Dear (name withheld),
 
I see Mikey has already responded to you, so I hope you have a somewhat better understanding of the situation. I’d just like to make a couple of points in addition.
 
One doesn’t have to read far into your message to see that you have, or perhaps had, the impression ours is an organization of anti-Christian atheists who hate God and religion and are busily promoting atheism. As Mikey has pointed out, that is not the case. The MRFF was formed when it became clear that there is an active attempt by by a group or sect of Christians who believe very passionately that theirs is the one and only true faith, that all other belief systems are false, and that it is their duty to spread their chosen faith to the world. One of their goals, in fact, is the make Christianity the official religion of the United States, and one of he parts of that is to make the U.S. military “Jesus’ Army.”

Just exactly what do you base your statement “One of their goals, in fact (WHAT FACTS) is to make Christianity the official religion of the US and one of  he (sic) parts of that is to make the US military “Jesus Army”.

 
Now you may or may not believe that this can be the case, but our experience demonstrates it to be so.

What experience.  Did someone tie you down and force any religion down your throat?  Give some specifics.  Claims of facts not supported are easy to make.

I personally have no problem with people having deeply felt, passionate convictions about whatever their belief system might be, but I think it’s only fair to acknowledge that others have just as much of a right to  their own.

I agree everyone has a right to their religious beliefs, or lack of belief in anything.  My experience with the Army chaplains, some really great people, is that they come from all faiths and I never had any chaplain try to pressure people to believe in one faith.  Our unit had a Catholic priest as chaplain, a great man, who never tried to “convert” anyone.  Even the WICA have their own chaplains.

 
For the people who attack us, the first line of assault is usually that we are atheists. Or communists. Or both. And then of course, because of Mikey’s name, we are Jews – often dirty, hooked-nosed, money-grubbing Jews who are Christ-killers. And of course there are variations on these ugly themes.

I did not assume that you organization is a group of any particular religious people, or a group of atheist.  I just found it odd that you would claim to represent all people in the military while you obviously try to tear down Christians, who by belief in their faith, feel it part of their faith to share their beliefs.  Again, share, not force anyone to do anything.  AND, hasn’t the military decided the people of the Muslim faith can wear that cloth around their heads?  Doesn’t that immediately tell you that they are Muslim?  Don’t some schools provide the special wash basin so Muslim children can perform the religious “washing of hands” before meals?  Muslims can do anything they want, it is just Christians that are selected as persecution and this has been going on for a long time.

 
Mikey, being a lawyer, chose to combat this effort by forming an organization to support an understanding of America’s laws and its Constitution, and in particular to endorse and defend the separation of church and state, which allows true freedom of religion, one of the fundamental premises of our land. That premise, the separation of church and state, is the one most attacked by the sect described above, because it makes impossible the realization of their goal.

There you go.  Mention the Constitution of the US and in the same sentence set forth the old “separation of church and state”.  No such part of our Constitution, not part of any of the amendments, a statement by Jefferson taken out of context.  Yet, used so often people really believe it is part of our Constitution or maybe one of the amendments.  Since they don’t teach civics in school anymore, no wonder our young people have no idea of what is and what is not in our Constitution and in the amendments to same.

 
You see, the freedom of religious choice actually allows, by definition, the choice of no religion, which is anathema to the true believer.

So you claim there are people with no religious faith or practice?  Maybe so, and if so, I support their right to believe what they may, but their rights do not supersede and/or replace my right to my own person religious freedoms.  You can’t have it both ways.  They have the right to believe and practice their “non-belief” yet want to impede my practice of my believe. 

 
Now, assuming you recognize that the premise of the organization is to ensure the freedom of religious or non-religious choice of all the women and men in our military, I hope you’ll also understand that we point out and stand against some things that might appear to you or to another Christian to be inconsequential, or you might see what we make an issue of as nit-picking, or silly, or, perhaps, anti-Christian. They are not.

I am not aware of any proof that any of the armed forces are trying to force anyone to believe anything.  State some proof of your claim.

 
 
One of the ways what I’ll call the ‘extremists’ move their project along is to take little steps that most people (most Americans who are religious being Christians) see as inoffensive or normal. So what if they want to add a Bible to a POW/MIA table, even though not all POWs and MIAs were Christians and the original POW/MIA tables did not include a religious artifact for that reason.

Hey, while in Vietnam on a remote fire support base, we had no access to PX or any other facilities to purchase needed items.  The army provided us with “Sundry Packs”, full of candy, cigarettes and other items.  They did not force us to use the candy or the cigarettes.  You were free to throw them in the trash.  Was the Army trying to get people addicted to tobacco?  No, they provided items needed by a large group of diverse people.  Throw it away if you don’t want it!  AND, if you don’t like a sign that says “God bless American”, look the other way.  I see things all the time that offend me.  Women with their breast hanging out.  Homosexuals practicing their “beliefs and freedoms” in public.  I simply look the other way.  Talk about a group that are trying to force their beliefs down my throat!!

 
But the separation of church and state means

Again, that old “separation of church and state”.  Please tell me the page number of any official document, constitution, or amendment that contains these words.  You see, you keep repeating it and repeating it and it does not exist!!!!!  But, say it enough and people will believe it.

that no official government body or organization can promote, promulgate, prefer or in any way show preference for one belief system over the others. While private groups, just like private people, acting on their own, are of course free to demonstrate their faith or practice their beliefs as they choose, within the limits of the law and military regulations, the government must be scrupulous in observing neutrality.
 
So, Santa Claus wearing a military uniform adorned with a badge saying “Christmas Force” and carrying a sign saying God Bless America may seem innocent fun to some, but to others it looks like Santa is an agent of the US Military and its Government and is praying to God.

Any idiot that thinks a blown up plastic Santa in a uniform is an agent of the US military has no right being in the armed forces.  He/she needs to seek professional help.  Get real people.  You are tilting at windmills.

 
That’s where we stand. I hope that helps.

And that’s where I stand.  I also took a look at your organization through Charity Navigator on line.  Not much info there.  How much does the retired BG receive in compensation?  Little things like how you spend your contributions would be nice to know.  Or, is this a great “charity” organization that proposes to represent the US Military while actually living a nice life off the contributions of poor suckers?  END OF COMMENTS  May you have a blessed day.  (Oh, did that offend you?  That I would hope that you would have a nice day?)

 
Best,
 
Mike Farrell
(MRFF Board of Advisors)

Response from MRFF Founder and President Mikey Weinstein
On Wed, Dec 11, 2019 at 1:42 PM Michael L Weinstein  wrote:
(name withheld)… Seriously?… You’re going to try that old canard about the fact that the constitution doesn’t actually and textually state “separation of church and state?… I can give you millions of other examples of things that are well settled law from our Supreme Court based upon interpretation of the Constitution… See Marbury versus Madison my friend… The constitution also doesn’t contain the word “God“ any place… If you are arrested and tried by a court those people think the Constitution allows you to have a speedy public and fair trial… The constitution actually only SAYS public and speedy it does not say “fair“ any place… That constitutional right came from caselaw along with the other several million I told you about… I’m beginning to think you are merely a lost cause here… And you believe that somehow your version of Christianity has superiority over all other versions of Christianity and all other faiths and non-faiths…?! You are seriously wrong on these matters… It may be your poor education or your prejudice or some sort of combination of both that creates this repugnant ignorance… I don’t mean this to offend you but what you wrote to me right out of the box was very offensive… I’m not going to address anything else you mentioned above at this time… Thank you, Mikey W.

Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member Mike Farrell

On Dec 11, 2019, at 4:40 PM, Mike  wrote:

Hi (name withheld),
Sorry, I don’t remember you. We get a lot of messages, mostly from run-of-the-mill bigots and offended Christian supremacists, a significant number of whom turn out to be anti-Semites, so the themes tend to be repeated.
Apparently Mikey sent you a message i wrote for someone else in an attempt to clarify some points. That someone else was fairly straightforward and basically confused about a few things, so I decided to try to be helpful. You are not him.
You’ve chosen to respond to a message not intended for you, but you do so based on your own beliefs and I’m unclear what they are, other than the obvious. I assume, though, from what I get in reading your response, that you’re unhappy with the MRFF, don’t care much for me, are ignorant of a number of things and are intent on being argumentative. So this is probably a waste of my time, but for what it’s worth I’ll try to make a few points.
The separation of church and state is settled law. You don’t like that. Too bad.
Christian supremacists make no bones about their desire to make America a Christian nation and the military “Jesus’ Army” and are quite open about it. Don’t take my word for it; ask them.
I agree that military chaplains are quite often great people. There is, however, an on-going attempt to fill their ranks with Christian fundamentalists. We have some ex-chaplains among our supporters who know a lot about that, but you probably don’t want to check it out.
The MRFF does not “try to tear down Christians.” Our ranks are full of Christians. We do respond to a lot of the kind of Christians who, like yourself, feel Christians are being persecuted. I have a sense that some of  them have a kind of martyr complex and are looking for justification for it. They, like you, point out the cultural accommodations the military has made for some and, despite their majoritarian status, express their resentment for that “special treatment” and want the same kinds of accommodations. (I’m not sure a crown of thorns would be acceptable to the military, but you can try)
And again, since you beef about it a lot, the separation of church and state is settled law.
You say I “claim there are people with no religious faith or practice.” I didn’t claim it, I said it. I’m not sure of the point you’re making, but yes, hard as you apparently find it to believe, there actually are people with no religious faith or practice. And no one here is suggesting that their rights supersede or replace yours. We just want to be sure you understand that yours do not supersede or replace theirs.
 
“Proof of my claim,” you want? I didn’t claim the armed forces are trying to “force anybody to believe anything.” It’s not the armed forces doing it. But we have thousands of expressions of concern from women and men in the military who are subjected to unwelcome overtures about Christianity, lectures on Christianity, preaching on Christianity and impositions of Christian imagery and Christian artifacts in official government times and places by people in authority who have the power and do so in spite of its being against the law and military regulations. Their passion to spread the “Good News” apparently knows no bounds. Our job is to remind them that there are bounds. There are appropriate times, places and circumstances wherein that’s fine, but they are clearly designated. To do so outside those properly designated times, places and circumstances puts the government in the position of appearing to illegally support or endorse proselytizing on behalf of one belief system over others.
 
Candy and cigarettes? Don’t be an idiot. I’m sure you “see things all the time that offend” you. Fox News probably gives you a menu of them. But, unsurprisingly, you miss the point. Government sponsorship is the issue here. Remember? It’s about the separation of church and state you so want to deny.
 
It hasn’t been a pleasure.
 
Mike Farrell
(MRFF Board of Advisors)

So, since I don’t believe the same things you believe, I’m a “run-of-the-mill bigot” and a “Christian supremacists” and “anti-Semites”.  In other words, I am not allowed to have and express an opinion without being label by many derogatory labels, based on assumptions and lack of facts from the few sentences I wrote.

I did not ask for your email to be sent to me.  It was used as an argument to rebut my comments about the plastic Santa.  You will have to take your complaints to the one who forwarded it to me as background or support of their opinion.

I assure you are I none of the above.  I support the right of every person to have any religious belief they may chose to have.  It’s a free country.  However, I have as much right to express an opinion as some TV series actor who uses his fame to support his opinions.

How can you do away with any thing that offends a few people without stomping on the rights of the majority to believe and act on and support the things they believe?

You will never convince me that a plastic Santa, with or without a military uniform on, with a sign that says “God bless America” is such a horrible thing that needs to be destroyed, moved, or covered up.  There are many gods.  The “god” in the sign was capitalized because it is the beginning of a sentence but I am sure everyone in your group jumped on the fact that it was God and not god, making it a specific “god”, especially the horrible God worshiped by Christians.  As I told the other person, I have studied all the major religions.  I would gladly go back on active duty and fight to support the right of every American to worship whatever they want to worship, or not to worship anything.  However, just because a person is in the military does not take away their right to believe whatever they believe and to express their beliefs in any method they wish to use.

What is wrong with asking god or God to bless our nation?  If I say “good morning” to you, does that hurt you even if you are having anything but a “good morning”?  Can’t you just accept that as a kind remark by someone?  If I say “God Bless American!”, regardless of who I am or what I am doing, does that really hurt anyone’s rights?  I wonder if you also support removing “one Nation under God” from the pledge of allegiance?  Come on.  We can’t destroy the history of our nation no matter how many people try to do so.  We can learn from our mistakes.

I’m through.  Sorry you got caught up in this discussion against your will.  BUT, if we all strive to do away with anything that “offends” us, we will be living in a horrible society with few rights left to anyone.

You might do better in arguing your opinions if you do not stick labels on a person just because he does not agree with your opinion.  We all know what “assumptions”  do for you.

We are finished.  Please do not bother responding.  Let’s agree to disagree and I really enjoyed MASH although it became very political especially with “Hawkeye”.  But, it was a TV show, a fictional situation, and I took it for what it was and enjoyed it.  It reminded me a lot of many of my situations and experiences in the US Army.

(name withheld)


Response from MRFF Advisory Board Member Mike Farrell

On Dec 12, 2019, at 2:16 PM, Mike  wrote:

 

Hi (name withheld),
 
Sorry, but you’ve either misunderstood me or decided to purposely misinterpret my words. I agree this is becoming a bore and am happy to end it, but not without clearing up what is either your confusion or your refusal to comprehend my words.
 
I did not say you were anything. I said, “We get a lot of messages, mostly from run-of-the-mill bigots and offended Christian supremacists, a significant number of whom turn out to be anti-Semites, so the themes tend to be repeated.” That is a fact. If it makes you uncomfortable, I’m not to blame. I’m explaining the reality of what we face on a regular basis. I don’t know if you fit into those categories because, as I said in the third paragraph, I’m unclear what your views are. I followed that by listing what I had assumed from what you had written.
 
Got it now?
 
In case it’s not yet clear to you, the inference you decided to draw from what I wrote, in order to feel justified in being offended, was incorrect.
 
It’s quite clear that you did not ask for my email to be sent to you. However, it was sent to you and you chose to react to it by posing questions, making comments and arguing points. Was I not, in your view, allowed to respond to your arguments, including your rather snarky comments, and answer your questions?
 
As to the rest of your rather lengthy response, we will apparently continue to disagree.  I’d only suggest that the point you continue to either manage missing or simply refuse to see, is that our objection is not to any person’s belief system or to Santa Claus or to God, all of which anyone who so chooses is welcome to embrace. it is to the implied endorsement, support and/or preference for them by the U.S. Government when they are presented by a government entity, in a government space, or by a person in authority., that we object to.
 
According to the law and military regulations, these things are determined to be inappropriate when they are not done in the proper time, place and manner.
 
We are not “offended” by anyone’s belief or non-belief and we don’t want to suppress or condemn any expression thereof. But in order to maintain the government’s position of neutrality, which in turn provides the freedom we all enjoy, care must be taken.
 
Mike Farrell
(MRFF Board of Advisors)

 

 
 
 

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5 Comments

  1. WFZ337

    Mikey is a liar – “We have over 450 paid and volunteer staff here at the foundation…” MRFF does have 450 paid and volunteer staff and their IRS Form 990 proves that. The only employee listed is Mikey or Chris Rodda.

  2. Grey One talks sass

    WFZ337,

    Can’t debate the issues on their merit so you cast doubt on how MRFF organizes their foundation?

    In other words, you have nothing so you’re pounding the table loudly.

  3. G

    WFZ337, are you going to go after the MRFF for tax evasion?

  4. jimbo

    I am a veteran and a strong supporter (in the past) of Mikey’s efforts to protect this nation from christian fanaticism. I am an atheist who is locally persecuted by these same type fanatics for simply asking that those who hope to impose their gods on us prove any god, their source of authority is a supernatural being. I’ve been thrown in jail by those who can’t tolerate my reasonable request for proof of any god, I can’t watch a sporting event on television without me and mine being constantly insulted and assaulted by the very same fanaticism that abuses me daily. I’ve been assaulted and my life threatened by these same people, my right to privacy is under assault as I can’t go anywhere without being tracked and assaulted. This behavior is criminal and I am under constant criminal assault. My only sin is asking for proof of non-existent supernatural beings.
    Each is guaranteed to believe as on wishes, but those who depend on supernatural beings for authority aren’t content to allow my beliefs, or my duty to speak out. Those who abuse Mikey are the same who don’t want to allow my beliefs, and duty to speak out. All because they believe something they can’t prove.

  5. WFZ337

    Jiimbo,
    Oh do tell, how are you assaulted with this so called fanaticism by watching a sporting event? Are you referring to athletes point up to God when they score a touchdown or hit a home run? Well dude, that is their personal right according to the First Amendment as well as it is their same right to thank God or Jesus Christ while being interviewed. Not one single thing you can do about that, so pull up your big boy panties and get over it.

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